Your Sanctification Is Not for You

What is the purpose of your sanctification? Who is it for? (Hint: It’s not for you.) We survey a number of passages from the New Testament to demonstrate the point of our growth in Christ.

MEMBERS: Christ Is Enough…Now What? (Transcript)

Jon and Justin have a spirited conversation about how the church has lost its focus and mission–and how that makes it difficult for people to find legitimate communion in Christ around the means of grace.

Christ Is Enough…Now What? (Transcript)

Many listeners are tracking with us that Christ is enough–that he has completely saved us. Many have come to see that pietism is unhelpful. But, now, you’re wondering: What do I do now? If that’s you, this podcast is for you.

MEMBERS: Christ Is Enough…Now What?

Jon and Justin have a spirited conversation about how the church has lost its focus and mission--and how that makes it difficult for people to find legitimate communion in Christ around the means of grace.

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Christ Is Enough…Now What?

Many listeners are tracking with us that Christ is enough–that he has completely saved us. Many have come to see that pietism is unhelpful. But, now, you’re wondering: What do I do now? If that’s you, this podcast is for you.

MEMBERS: The Slow Death of Pietism (Transcript)

We get a little bit more punchy as we talk about the dangers of pietism as it relates to the gathered saints in the local church and the damage that it can cause. We hope this conversation is beneficial to you as it was to us. We look forward to you listening.

The Slow Death Of Pietism (Transcript)

On today’s episode, we are able and blessed to sit around the same table to discuss and meet with our old friend pietism. The other night, we were discussing how pietism dies a very slow and painful death. We also talked about the damage it can cause to our assurance and what we see when we look at ourselves in Christ. In this podcast, we discuss the slow and painful death of pietism and how it can harm us.

MEMBERS: The Slow Death of Pietism

We get a little bit more punchy as we talk about the dangers of pietism as it relates to the gathered saints in the local church and the damage that it can cause. We hope this conversation is beneficial to you as it was to us. We look forward to you listening.

Register
This content is for our members only.

Log In Subscribe

The Slow Death of Pietism

On today’s episode, we are able and blessed to sit around the same table to discuss and meet with our old friend pietism. The other night, we were discussing how pietism dies a very slow and painful death. We also talked about the damage it can cause to our assurance and what we see when we look at ourselves in Christ. In this podcast, we discuss the slow and painful death of pietism and how it can harm us.

Archive Favorites: Obedience Is Not a Dirty Word (Transcript)

In this episode, the guys talk about evangelicalism. Where did it come from? What produced it? What kind of effect has evangelical culture had on Christians? If you feel as though you’re drowning–if you are struggling and disenchanted–you are not crazy. And you are not alone.

Dazed and Confused: Does 2 Peter 1:1-12 Teach Pietism?

In this episode, the guys talk about a passage of Scripture that is often misunderstood: 2 Peter 1:1-12. Is Peter teaching pietism in this text? We consider the gospel, as well as the saint/sinner reality, and how those things relate to our pursuit of piety.

MEMBERS: Triumphalism (Transcript)

The guys continue the conversation on triumphalism and by considering the exhortation of Paul to walk by the Spirit so that we don’t gratify the desires of the flesh.

Triumphalism (Transcript)

In this episode, the guys talk about triumphalism. The impression we’re often given in the church is that we should be always and consistently improving. We should be living “the victorious Christian life.” And, if we’re not, we should be concerned. What do we make of all this?

Triumphalism

In this episode, the guys talk about triumphalism. The impression we’re often given in the church is that we should be always and consistently improving. We should be living “the victorious Christian life.” And, if we’re not, we should be concerned. What do we make of all this?